Jennifer Harvey Sallin, MA, LLPC, NCC is a psychologist, coach, mentor, trainer and author who dedicates her work to raising awareness about giftedness in adulthood, and supporting gifted adults to understand their unique mind and channel their uncommon potential and intensity with self-awareness and purpose. She spends a lot of her time teaching and training professionals who support the gifted and writing on giftedness and self-development. She is co-founder of Rediscovering Yourself, and founder of an international community of gifted adults, www.intergifted.com, which has an international network of coaches and mentors dedicated to supporting gifted adults. She lives in Switzerland and works locally and by Skype internationally (in English, French and Italian).

values

Discovering Your Highest Values

If I ask you how a bicycle works, you probably will say yes; but if I ask you for a precise explanation of exactly how all of the bicycle’s parts work together, you may have to think longer, and might even need to consult an actual bicycle in order to answer the question competently. It is similar with our values: we think we know what we value in life, but when it comes to fully understanding our highest values, and living by them consistently, we aren’t so sure anymore. Sometimes, we need to consciously examine our most authentic values, and like with the bicycle, observe them closely to fully understand how they work. This article holds a favorite values exercises that I regularly do with clients in coaching.

slowing down

Slowing Down to Speed Up: Hurrying vs. Observing

Sometimes hurrying up is to our advantage in life – when we’re running to catch a train, when we’re faced with an important deadline, or when we’re joyfully accomplishing a personal challenge. However, hurrying, beyond a certain point, becomes self-destructive. As a constant way of being, it is not sustainable. It is a “yang” energy in our lives which must be balanced out by the “yin” of slowing down, if it is to be effective and valuable. It is a “doing” micro-energy that can only have meaning and value in the context of a “being” meta-energy. Clients are often initially disappointed to learn this, because they arrive at the coaching process in a race to reach their goals, and are often impatient to move forward. But it is the wonderful yin meta-energy that gives their goals context; and to see this, they first must slow down and observe.

Vivere con Intensità: Il significato dell’iperdotazione secondo Dabrowski

Kazimierz Dabrowski è stato uno psichiatra, uno psicologo e un medico polacco, e si dice “Il Padre della ricerca sulla iperdotazione”. Era un pensatore acuto che vedeva l’esperienza dell’iperdotazione come molto più di una misura dell’intelligenza; è invece un’esperienza e un processo multi-dimensionale, complessa e variabile. Il termine «multi-dimensionale» si riferisce al fatto che nella concezione di Dabrowski, l’perdotazione è un’intensa esperienza globale piuttosto che una semplice esperienza intellettuale.

personality

Personality Preferences: Extraversion, Introversion and Authentic Action

Have you ever wondered why at times your creativity and productivity seem to flow, and other times you can’t think straight and produce mediocre work? Why at times you are happy to be with people, and other times you are fed up with their presence? In reality, each of us has a preferred way of approaching and ordering activities and tasks, and if we plan according to our preferences – when and with whom and how we collaborate, solve problems, make decisions, and brainstorm, for example – we naturally find effectiveness and joy. The trick is knowing our preferences in the first place! Let’s learn about them together…

Binocular Behavior

Binocular Behavior & The Gifted – A Dysfunctional Form of Self-Protection and Control

Observing others’ behaviors is, in itself, rather healthy. It allows us to appropriately anticipate and react to kindness or threat from others, which serves to give us motivation (anticipating kindness) or information to protect ourselves (anticipating threat). However, “binocular behavior”, as I call it, is a dysfunctional level of this observation behavior – when we try too hard to anticipate kindness or threat. Relating to the world from a distance, we distort reality in ways that cause us to lose our motivation or to create feelings of insecurity. Gifted people, with their strong imaginative, abstracting and pattern recognition skills – in combination with their general intensity of mind and experience – sometimes use their “binoculars” to create very elaborate, if misguided, theories about what is happening in others’ minds, the results of which can be socially unpleasant and painful. This article aims at helping gifted individuals put down their binoculars and relate directly with the world, and to understand the crucial role that differences in cognitive timing play in the tendency to pick them up in the first place.

carried emotions

Emotions and Carried Emotions

Many people equate emotions with feelings, but they are two different things. Many people also believe their thoughts are their feelings, and that is not the case either. Understanding the differences, links and feedback loops between emotion, feeling, and thought is an important basic understanding in psychological and emotional health. This, as well as the differences between self-experienced emotion and carried emotion, are foundational aspects for gaining conscious control over one’s self and one’s life experiences.